Thulani Sibisi and Diepkloof Athletic Club suit up to help raise awareness about prostate cancer

Thanks to our vice-chairman Patient Affairs, Thulani Sibisi and the Diepkloof Athletics club, for suiting up for a run through the streets of Soweto on Heritage day to help raise awareness about prostate cancer.

Suit up for a little adrenaline rush!

We don’t don’t really mind what you do when you suit up to help raise awareness about prostate cancer. Feel free to be a little bit adventurous.

A special thanks to the guys from Face Adrenaline Bungy Jump for helping us to shoot this video at the highest Bungy jump spot in the world.
Face Adrenaline Bungy Jump 

Oncology and Urology Departments Suiting Up

Great to see Oncology and Urology Departments from all around South Africa suiting up for prostate cancer awareness month.

Suit Up and bowl

You can suit up on any day in September. Get your Suit Up badge by clicking on our PCF store. Don’t forget to upload photos of yourself suited up to: #suitupseptember


 

Suit Up and run to help us raise awareness about prostate cancer

September is prostate cancer awareness month. Enter our virtual charity challenge and help us raise awareness  about prostate cancer.

 

Diarise a Date to Suit Up in September

We don’t really mind what you do for prostate cancer awareness month this September, as long as you do it in a suit.

Pick a day and wear a suit, or get your whole company or sports club to suit up.
Pick any day in September, purchase a downloadable suit up badge from our online shop and wear it with your suit to show people that you’re supporting prostate cancer awareness month.
Stickers cost R50 each and can be purchased on our online store.

Bulk orders
For corporates who wish to have to have an event at their offices we can arrange for a delivery of Suit Up September stickers.
(Minimum order –  20 stickers)
We can also arrange for a virtual presentation on prostate cancer at your organisation or company.

Enter our virtual charity challenge
Run, walk, cycle, or pick any activity of your choosing, as long as you do it in a suit, or at least part of a suit.
This is a fun way for all those active people out there to help us raise awareness about prostate cancer.

Bruce Fordyce takes the test for prostate cancer

Even guys who win the Comrades Marathon 9 times can get prostate cancer. That’s why Bruce Fordyce takes the test. He knows that prostate cancer that is  detected in the early stages is potentially curable. Check out the prostate cancer screening article in our information section to find out when you should start taking the test.

 

 

Join one of our online support groups

A  diagnosis of prostate cancer can be scary and it’s good to know that you’re not alone.

If you feel that you would like to connect with other men who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer and who have undergone the same treatment that you have been scheduled for, then you are welcome to join one of our e-mail support groups.

Our prostatectomy support group
This is for men who are about to undergo a radical prostatectomy or have undergone a prostatectomy.

Our brachytherapy support group
This is for men who are about to undergo brachytherapy  or have undergone brachytherapy

The purpose of these support groups is not to replace the advice from your doctor or other healthcare professionals. We are here to:

Seek and offer support

Ask questions

Share information

Share personal stories and experiences of prostate cancer

To join one of these support groups please e-mail: ceo@prostate-ca.co.za

 

Dr Michael Mol takes the test for prostate cancer

Dr Michael Mol is a Medical doctor so he knows how important it is to take the test every year for prostate cancer.

Men with a family history of prostate cancer should start screening at the age of 40.

So don’t wait ’til it’s too late.

Take the test!

Columnist, Solly Moeng is glad that he took the test

Columnist, Solly Moeng is one of those men who is diligent about going for his annual health checks. His annual check-ups include a PSA test. Solly describes how this led to the early detection of prostate cancer. Thankfully, early treatment with a robotic assisted prostatectomy has been successful and Solly is now cancer free.